Archives August 2023

UK driving license

Outline Description
Introduction Overview of the importance of a driving license in the UK and what this article covers.
Understanding the UK Driving License Explanation of what a UK driving license is and its significance.
Types of UK Driving Licenses Different categories and classes of driving licenses available in the UK.
Eligibility Criteria Requirements for applying for a driving license in the UK.
Applying for a Provisional License Step-by-step guide to obtaining a provisional driving license.
Preparing for the Theory Test Study tips and resources for the theory test.
The Theory Test Details on what to expect in the theory test and how to pass it.
Preparing for the Practical Test Tips and resources for preparing for the practical driving test.
The Practical Driving Test What to expect during the practical driving test and tips for success.
Common Mistakes to Avoid Frequent errors made by candidates and how to avoid them.
Driving Lessons and Schools How to choose the right driving school and instructor.
Costs Involved in Learning to Drive Breakdown of expenses related to learning to drive and obtaining a license.
The Importance of Practice The role of practice in becoming a confident driver.
Driving Test Day: What to Expect A detailed walkthrough of the driving test day.
Receiving Your Full License What happens after you pass the test and how to get your full license.
Renewing Your Driving License Procedures for renewing a UK driving license.
Lost or Stolen License Steps to take if your driving license is lost or stolen.
Penalties and Points System Overview of the penalties and points system in the UK.
Driving with Medical Conditions Rules and regulations for driving with medical conditions.
Driving License for Foreigners How non-UK residents can obtain a UK driving license.
Driving in the UK as a Foreigner Special considerations for foreigners driving in the UK.
Upgrading Your License How to upgrade your license for different vehicle categories.
Changes in Driving License Regulations Recent changes and updates in UK driving license regulations.
Environmental Impact of Driving How driving affects the environment and tips for eco-friendly driving.
Future of Driving Licenses in the UK Predictions and trends for the future of driving licenses in the UK.
FAQs Frequently asked questions about UK driving licenses.
Conclusion Summary of key points and final thoughts.

Introduction to UK driving license 

Driving in the UK is a rite of passage for many and an essential skill for most. Whether you’re a teenager eager to gain independence or an adult looking to add convenience to your daily routine, obtaining a UK driving license is a significant milestone. This comprehensive guide covers everything you need to know about securing a driving license in the UK, from the initial application to passing your tests and receiving your full license. We’ll delve into each step of the process, providing valuable tips and insights to ensure your journey is smooth and successful.

Understanding the UK Driving License

A UK driving license is a document issued by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) that permits individuals to operate various types of vehicles on public roads. It’s not just a piece of plastic; it’s a certification of your ability to drive safely and legally. The license includes your personal details, photograph, and categories of vehicles you’re allowed to drive. It’s essential for identification purposes and for proving your right to drive within the UK and many other countries.

Types of UK Driving Licenses

The UK driving license system categorizes licenses based on the type of vehicle you’re authorized to operate. These categories range from motorcycles and cars to large goods vehicles and buses. The most common type is the Category B license, which allows you to drive standard cars and small vans. Other categories include:

  • Category A: Motorcycles
  • Category C: Large goods vehicles
  • Category D: Buses and minibuses
  • Category BE: Cars with trailers

Understanding these categories is crucial when applying for a license, as each requires different qualifications and tests.

Eligibility Criteria

Before applying for a UK driving licenseUK driving license, you must meet specific eligibility criteria. These include:

  • Age Requirements: You must be at least 17 years old to apply for a car driving license. For mopeds, the minimum age is 16, and for larger vehicles, it ranges from 18 to 24, depending on the vehicle category.
  • Residency: You must be a resident of the UK.
  • Provisional License: You need a provisional driving license before you can start learning to drive.

Meeting these criteria is the first step towards obtaining your driving license.

Applying for a Provisional License

A provisional license is a prerequisite for learning to drive and taking your driving tests. To apply for a provisional license, follow these steps:

  1. Online Application: Visit the official DVLA website and fill out the online application form. You’ll need to provide personal details, proof of identity, and a recent passport-sized photograph.
  2. Payment: Pay the application fee, which can be done online using a debit or credit card.
  3. Postal Application: Alternatively, you can apply by post using a D1 form available from post offices. Include the necessary documents and payment.

Once your application is processed, you’ll receive your provisional license, allowing you to start your driving lessons.

Preparing for the Theory Test UK driving license 

The theory test is an essential part of obtaining a UK driving license. So  It assesses your knowledge of road rules, signs, and safe driving practices. To prepare effectively:

  • Study Materials: Use official DVLA study guides and online resources.
  • Practice Tests: Take multiple practice tests to familiarize yourself with the format and types of questions.
  • Highway Code: Thoroughly read the Highway Code, as many questions are based on its contents.

Effective preparation is key to passing the theory test on your first attempt.

The Theory Test

The theory test consists of two parts: multiple-choice questions and hazard perception. The multiple-choice section covers various topics related to driving rules and regulations. The hazard perception part assesses your ability to recognize and respond to potential hazards on the road. Here’s what to expect:

  • Multiple-Choice Questions: You’ll answer 50 questions, and you need to score at least 43 to pass.
  • Hazard Perception: You’ll watch 14 video clips and identify developing hazards. A minimum score of 44 out of 75 is required to pass.

Both sections must be passed in the same test session.

Preparing for the Practical Test

Once you’ve passed the theory test, the next step is preparing for the practical driving test. This involves hands-on training with a certified driving instructor. Here are some tips for effective preparation:

  • Regular Practice: Schedule regular driving lessons and practice sessions.
  • Mock Tests: Take mock tests to simulate the actual test environment and reduce anxiety.
  • Feedback: Listen to your instructor’s feedback and work on improving your weak areas.

Consistent practice and learning from mistakes will boost your confidence and readiness for the test.

The Practical Driving Test

The practical driving test assesses your driving skills but in real-world conditions. It includes:

  • Eyesight Check: You’ll be asked to read a number plate from a distance.
  • Show Me, Tell Me: You’ll answer questions about vehicle safety and operation.
  • Driving Ability: You’ll demonstrate various driving maneuvers and follow road rules under the examiner’s observation.
  • Independent Driving: You’ll drive independently for about 20 minutes, following either a sat nav or traffic signs.

Passing this test demonstrates your ability to drive safely and competently.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Many candidates fail their driving tests due to common errors. Avoid these pitfalls by:

  • Observation: Always check mirrors and blind spots.
  • Speed Control: Maintain appropriate speed and avoid speeding.
  • Signals: Use indicators correctly and timely.
  • Maneuvers: Practice maneuvers like parallel parking and three-point turns.

Awareness and practice can help you steer clear of these mistakes.

Driving Lessons and Schools

Choosing the right driving school and instructor is crucial for your learning experience. Consider the following:

  • Reputation: Look for schools with positive reviews and high pass rates.
  • Qualified Instructors: Ensure instructors are DVSA-approved.
  • Lesson Flexibility: Choose schools offering flexible lesson timings that fit your schedule.

Investing in a reputable driving school increases your chances of passing the test.

Costs Involved in Learning to Drive

Learning to drive involves various costs, including:

  • Provisional License Fee: Approximately £34 for online applications.
  • Theory Test Fee: Around £23.
  • Practical Test Fee: £62 for weekday tests, £75 for weekends and evenings.
  • Driving Lessons: Costs vary but average around £24-£30 per hour.

Budgeting for these expenses is essential for a smooth learning journey.

The Importance of Practice

Practice is vital in becoming a confident and competent driver. Regular practice helps:

  • Build Confidence: Familiarity with driving reduces nervousness.
  • Improve Skills: Consistent practice hones your driving abilities.
  • Reinforce Learning: Repeated practice solidifies knowledge and skills.

Commit to regular practice sessions to enhance your driving proficiency.

Driving Test Day: What to Expect

Test day can be nerve-wracking, but knowing what to expect can help:

  • Preparation: Ensure you have your provisional license and theory test certificate.
  • Vehicle Check: Make sure your car is roadworthy and meets test requirements.
  • Relaxation Techniques: Use deep breathing or other relaxation methods to stay calm.

Being well-prepared and calm will improve your chances of success.

Receiving Your Full License

UK driving license Once you pass the practical test, you’ll receive a pass certificate and can immediately start driving. Your full driving license will be sent to you within three weeks. Keep your provisional license until your full license arrives.

Renewing Your Driving License

UK driving licenses need to be renewed every 10 years. To renew:

  • Online Application: Use the DVLA website for a quick renewal process.
  • Postal Application: Alternatively, apply by post using a D1 form.
  • Fees: Pay the renewal fee, which is typically around £14.

Timely renewal ensures you remain legally eligible to drive.

Lost or Stolen License

If your driving license is lost or stolen, take these steps:

  • Report: Inform the police and obtain a crime reference number if stolen.
  • Apply for a Replacement: Use the DVLA online service or apply by post with a D1 form.
  • Fee: Pay the replacement fee, usually around £20.

Acting quickly ensures you’re not left without a valid license.

Penalties and Points System

UK driving license operates a penalty points system to maintain road safety. Points are added to your license for various traffic offenses. Accumulating too many points can lead to disqualification. Common offenses and their points include:

 

  • Speeding: 3-6 points.
  • Using a Mobile Phone: 6 points.
  • Drink Driving: Disqualification and a minimum of 3 points upon reinstatement.

Understanding and adhering to road laws helps maintain a clean driving record.

Driving with Medical Conditions

If you have a medical condition, you must inform the DVLA. Conditions affecting driving include:

  • Epilepsy: Must be seizure-free for one year.
  • Vision Impairments: Must meet specific eyesight standards.
  • Diabetes: Regular medical reviews may be required.

Driving safely with medical conditions involves regular medical checks and compliance with DVLA regulations.

Driving License for Foreigners

Foreign nationals residing in the UK can obtain a UK driving license. The process involves:

  • Exchanging License: Depending on your country of origin, you may be able to exchange your license without taking a test.
  • Taking Tests: If exchange isn’t possible, you must pass the theory and practical tests.
  • Provisional License: Apply for a provisional license as the first step.

Understanding these requirements simplifies the process for foreign drivers.

Driving in the UK as a Foreigner

Driving in the UK as a foreigner involves some unique challenges:

  • Left-Hand Driving: Adjusting to driving on the left side of the road.
  • Road Rules: Familiarizing yourself with UK-specific traffic laws.
  • Insurance: Ensuring you have valid car insurance.

Preparation and practice are key to a smooth transition.

Upgrading Your LicenseUK driving license

You can upgrade your driving license to drive larger butmore specialized vehicles. This involves:

  • Additional Tests: Passing theory and practical tests for the new vehicle category.
  • Medical Requirements: Meeting any additional medical criteria.
  • Training: Undergoing specific training for the new vehicle type.

Upgrading expands your driving capabilities and opportunities.

Changes in Driving License Regulations

Driving license regulations can change, affecting new and existing drivers. Recent changes include:

  • MOT Exemptions: Changes to MOT requirements for electric vehicles.
  • New Categories: Introduction of new vehicle categories and license requirements.

Staying informed about these changes ensures compliance with current laws.

Environmental Impact of Driving

Driving has a significant environmental impact. To reduce your carbon footprint:

  • Eco-Friendly Vehicles: Consider electric or hybrid cars.
  • Efficient Driving: Adopt fuel-efficient driving habits.
  • Public Transport: Use public transportation when possible.

Eco-friendly driving benefits both the environment and your wallet.

Future of Driving Licenses in the UK

The future of driving licenses in the UK is evolving with technological advancements:

  • Digital Licenses: Potential introduction of digital driving licenses.
  • Autonomous Vehicles: Regulations for self-driving cars.
  • Green Initiatives: Increased emphasis on eco-friendly driving.

Staying updated on these trends prepares you for future changes.

FAQs

How do I apply for a UK driving license?

  • You can apply online through the DVLA website so by post using a D1 form from the post office.

What is the minimum age to apply for a UK driving license?

  • The minimum age is 17 for a car driving license.

How long is a UK driving license valid?

  • It is valid for 10 years, after which it must be renewed.

Can I drive in the UK with a foreign license?

  • Yes, but you may need to exchange it for a UK license or pass the UK driving tests, depending on your country of origin.

What should I do if I lose my driving license?

  • Report it to the police if stolen and apply for a replacement through the DVLA.

What happens if I accumulate too many penalty points?

  • Accumulating too many points can lead to disqualification from driving.

Conclusion

Obtaining a UK driving license is a multifaceted process that requires careful preparation and understanding of various regulations. From applying for a provisional license to passing the theory and practical tests, each step is crucial in becoming a competent driver. By following this comprehensive guide, you’ll be well-equipped to navigate the process smoothly and confidently. Embrace the journey, and soon you’ll be driving with the freedom and responsibility that a UK driving license provides.

Inbound Links Suggestions:

  • Link to a detailed article on the Highway Code.
  • Link to a guide on eco-friendly driving tips.

Outbound Links Suggestions:

UK DRIVING LICENCE

Want to know the ins and outs of the UK driving licence? You’ve come to the right place

As well as being a key form of identification, the UK driving licence gives you the right to drive a car, plus certain types of other vehicles. But as the licence is full of information, codes and categories, you might be after an explainer on both what the front of the driving licence shows, and what the details on the back of a driving licence mean. This guide will explain all this.

Front of the driving licence explained

The front of the driving licence displays a photograph of the licence holder with the licence expiry date printed on top, as well key information about them, and the types of vehicle their licence permits them to drive.

Each section on the front of a driving licence is numbered, with each number showing the following information:

1. Your surname
2. Your first name(s)
3. Your date and country of birth
4a. The date your licence was issued
4b. The date your licence expires
4c. What agency issued your licence (usually DVLA)
5. Your driving licence number*
6. Although not numbered on the licence, your photograph is 6
7. Your signature
8. Your address
9. The categories of vehicle you’re permitted to drive – see next section.

*This is made up of the first five letters of your surname, your birth year, month and day, plus the letters two of your middle names begin with, with the number ‘9’ standing in if you only have one middle name. Note the two numbers that make up your birth year are split in two and bookend the long number, rather than being displayed sequentially. There are also three computer-assigned digits at the end, plus a separate pair of numbers on the same line that represent your licence issue number.

Back of the driving licence explained

A number of categories are displayed on the back of your driving licence, displayed in a table with four columns, labelled 9-12.

Column 9 shows the code and an image representing classes of vehicle
Column 10 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle is valid
Column 11 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle expires
Column 12 shows driving licence codes – EG ‘115’ means organ donor (see section after next).

What are driving licence categories?

While the icons help you work out what vehicles you’re allowed to drive, they might not all be intuitively understandable.

Driving licence categories explained

AM (‘q’ proper to 2013): mopeds capable of at least 15mph and no more than 28mph, and light quadricycles with the same speed requirements, weighing no more than 350kg.
A1: motorcycles under 125cc capacity and 11kW (15hp) of power
A2: motorcycles with no more power than 35kW (47.6hp)
A: motorcycles with more than 35kW
B: cars**
B1: four-wheeled light vehicles (under 550kg)
BE: cars with trailers
C1: medium-sized vehicles weighing 3,500kg to 7,500kg carrying no more than eight passengers
C1E: medium-sized vehicles with trailers
C: large goods vehicles weighing over 3,500kg
CE: large goods vehicles with trailers
D1: minibuses no longer than 8 metres and with no more than 16 seats
D: buses with more than eight seats
D1E: minibuses with trailers over 750kg
DE: buses with trailers over 750kg
f: agricultural tractors
g: roadrollers
h: tracked vehicles
k: ride-on mowers and pedestrian-controlled vehicles

**Category B includes light vans (weighing under 3,500kg) and means different things with regard to towing depending on when you passed your test – see our guide to towing for more information.

What are driving licence codes?

As detailed in the section before one, in addition to driving-licence categories there exist driving-licence codes.

These do not refer to vehicles, but rather certain conditions that can be placed on a person’s driving licence, for one or many of the class of vehicles they can drive. For example a code might indicate you have to wear corrective glasses or lenses to drive, or that you are an organ donor.

The licence codes are as follows (information taken from UK Gov website, multiple codes shown per line to reduce scrolling).

01 – eyesight correction, for example glasses or contact lenses 02 – hearing/communication aid 10 – modified transmission 15 – modified clutch 20 – modified braking systems 25 – modified accelerator systems 30 – combined braking and accelerator systems (for licences issued before 28 November 2016) 31 – pedal adaptations and pedal safeguards 32 – combined service brake and accelerator systems 33 – combined service brake, accelerator and steering systems 35 – modified control layouts 40 – modified steering 42 – modified rear-view mirror(s) 43 – modified driving seats 44 – modifications to motorbikes 44 (1) – single operated brake 44 (2) – adapted front wheel brake 44 (3) – adapted rear wheel brake 44 (4) – adapted accelerator 44 (5) – (adjusted) manual transmission and manual clutch 44 (6) – (adjusted) rear-view mirror(s) 44 (7) – (adjusted) commands (direction indicators, braking light, etc) 44 (8) – seat height allowing the driver, in sitting position, to have two feet on the surface at the same time and balance the motorcycle during stopping and standing 44 (11) – adapted foot rest 44 (12) – adapted hand grip 45 – motorbikes only with sidecar 46 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014) 70 – exchange of licence 71 – duplicate of licence 78 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmission 79 – restricted to vehicles in conformity with the specifications stated in brackets on your licence 79 (2) – restricted to category AM vehicles of the 3-wheel or light quadricycle type 79 (3) – restricted to tricycles 96 – allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer where the trailer weighs at least 750kg, and the combined weight of the vehicle and trailer is between 3,500kg and 4,250kg 97 – not allowed to drive category C1 vehicles which are required to have a tachograph fitted 101 – not for hire or reward (that is, not to make a profit) 102 – drawbar trailers only 103 – subject to certificate of competence 105 – vehicle not more than 5.5 metres long 106 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmissions 107 – not more than 8,250 kilograms 108 – subject to minimum age requirements 110 – limited to transporting persons with restricted mobility 111 – limited to 16 passenger seats 113 – limited to 16 passenger seats except for automatics 114 – with any special controls required for safe driving 115 – organ donor 118 – start date is for earliest entitlement 119 – weight limit for vehicle does not apply 121 – restricted to conditions specified in the Secretary of State’s notice 122 – valid on successful completion: Basic Moped Training Course. This does not apply to trial e-scooters 125 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014)

Driving licence FAQs

Where is the driving licence number?

Your driving licence number can be found on the front of your photocard licence, under section 5.

Where is the issue number of a driving licence?

Your driving-licence issue number is on the same line as your licence number, with a slight space between the two numbers.

What type of driving licence do I have?

There are two main types of driving licence in the UK, full and provisional. A full licence will be pink and a provisional licence will be green, and clearly marked.

Following on from that there are a number of different licence categories, which set out what type of vehicles you are allowed to drive. If you have passed your car driving test you will be allowed to drive cars, which are class B on your driving licence, defined as vehicles with no more than eight passenger seats, and weighing no more than 3,500kg, fully laden.

Are paper driving licences still valid?

If you have a paper driving licence that was issued before March 2000 and the information on it is still correct, it is still valid. If you need to change your name or address, a photocard licence will be issued to replace the paper one, though.

Buy Driving Licence Without Test In UK

Everything You Need to Know About the UK Driving Licence

Beginning from the basics, a UK driving licence is a formal certificate that permits its bearer to handle motorized vehicles on communal roads such as an expressway. Keeping in mind that the United Kingdom is comprised of Northern Ireland and Great Britain, there are two different agencies in charge of issuing driving licenses.

In Northern Ireland, the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA) is responsible for the issuance of driving licenses. On the other hand, in Great Britain, the administration of licenses is done by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

A driving licence is a mandatory certificate to possess, for any individual driving a vehicle on any public road in the UK.

What are the steps to obtain the driving licence in the UK?

  1. Check if you can drive ( Check what age you can driveRequirements for driving legallyDriving eyesight rules)
  2. Get a provisional driving licence.
  3. Learn to drive and prepare for theory test
  4. Book the theory test (£23, you must have provisional driving licence to book theory test)
  5. Book your driving test (£62 to £75, you must have passed theory test, to book the driving test)
  6. You can start driving as soon as you pass your driving test. You must have an insurance policy that allows you to drive without supervision.

Types Of Driving Licenses

There are multiple kinds of driving licenses in the UK, all falling under different categorizations. However, in this case, we will focus on the standard classification.

1. THE AM CLASS

The AM categorization implies that you can control a vehicle with either two or three wheels. These vehicles move at a speed between 15.5 and 28 miles per hour. In addition to this, these two or three-wheeled motor vehicles should not exceed a weight of 350 kilograms, exclusive of batteries.

2.      THE B CLASS

This classification allows you to drive any sort of motor vehicle. You are allowed to handle cars that bear a maximum authorized mass of 3500 kilograms, with the topmost number of commuter seats being 8. If you possess a driving licence under category B and you are above the age of 21, you can practically control a three-wheeled tricycle with a power volume exceeding 15 kilowatts.

3.      THE F CLASS

This F categorization of driving licenses allows the owner to drive a farming tractor.

4.      THE K CLASS

Possession of a driving license under the K category implies that you are allowed to drive a pedestrian-managed vehicle. Such vehicles are mainly self-moving, a good example being a mower.

5.      THE Q CLASS

This classification of driving licenses authorizes the holder to handle a two-wheeled vehicle whose engine magnitude does not exceed 50 cubic centimeters. Also, this vehicle’s maximum speed should be 15 miles per hour.

How To Obtain a Driving License in The United Kingdom?

Registering for your provisional driving license (initial driving licence that allows you to learn how to drive) requires you to:

  • At least, be 3 months away from turning 16 years old.
  • Possess the ability to read a license plate from a distance of 20 meters.
  • Have lawfully resided in the United Kingdom for a cumulative minimum of 185 days within the past year.
  • Visit official website to learn more.

On the other hand, to obtain a full driving license while in possession of a provisional one, you need to:

How To Renew a Driving License?

Renewal of a driving license is easy, especially if you own an authentic United Kingdom passport. If you would like to renew your license online, you should :

  • Have a legal United Kingdom passport.
  • Be an inhabitant of either Wales, England, or Scotland.
  • Have your present driving license.
  • Have your public insurance numbers.
  • Inscription of your residents for the past 3 years.
  • Make a mobile payment of 14€.

Note that if you are over 70 years old, the application procedure will be different.

For more more information on how to renew licence click here.

Get Driving Licence Today

The UK driving licence explained

Want to know the ins and outs of the UK driving licence? You’ve come to the right place

As well as being a key form of identification, the UK driving licence gives you the right to drive a car, plus certain types of other vehicles. But as the licence is full of information, codes and categories, you might be after an explainer on both what the front of the driving licence shows, and what the details on the back of a driving licence mean. This guide will explain all this.

Front of the driving licence explained

The front of the driving licence displays a photograph of the licence holder with the licence expiry date printed on top, as well key information about them, and the types of vehicle their licence permits them to drive.

Each section on the front of a driving licence is numbered, with each number showing the following information:

1. Your surname
2. Your first name(s)
3. Your date and country of birth
4a. The date your licence was issued
4b. The date your licence expires
4c. What agency issued your licence (usually DVLA)
5. Your driving licence number*
6. Although not numbered on the licence, your photograph is 6
7. Your signature
8. Your address
9. The categories of vehicle you’re permitted to drive – see next section.

*This is made up of the first five letters of your surname, your birth year, month and day, plus the letters two of your middle names begin with, with the number ‘9’ standing in if you only have one middle name. Note the two numbers that make up your birth year are split in two and bookend the long number, rather than being displayed sequentially. There are also three computer-assigned digits at the end, plus a separate pair of numbers on the same line that represent your licence issue number.

Back of the driving licence explained

A number of categories are displayed on the back of your driving licence, displayed in a table with four columns, labelled 9-12.

Column 9 shows the code and an image representing classes of vehicle
Column 10 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle is valid
Column 11 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle expires
Column 12 shows driving licence codes – EG ‘115’ means organ donor (see section after next).

What are driving licence categories?

While the icons help you work out what vehicles you’re allowed to drive, they might not all be intuitively understandable.

Driving licence categories explained

AM (‘q’ proper to 2013): mopeds capable of at least 15mph and no more than 28mph, and light quadricycles with the same speed requirements, weighing no more than 350kg.
A1: motorcycles under 125cc capacity and 11kW (15hp) of power
A2: motorcycles with no more power than 35kW (47.6hp)
A: motorcycles with more than 35kW
B: cars**
B1: four-wheeled light vehicles (under 550kg)
BE: cars with trailers
C1: medium-sized vehicles weighing 3,500kg to 7,500kg carrying no more than eight passengers
C1E: medium-sized vehicles with trailers
C: large goods vehicles weighing over 3,500kg
CE: large goods vehicles with trailers
D1: minibuses no longer than 8 metres and with no more than 16 seats
D: buses with more than eight seats
D1E: minibuses with trailers over 750kg
DE: buses with trailers over 750kg
f: agricultural tractors
g: roadrollers
h: tracked vehicles
k: ride-on mowers and pedestrian-controlled vehicles

**Category B includes light vans (weighing under 3,500kg) and means different things with regard to towing depending on when you passed your test – see our guide to towing for more information.

What are driving licence codes?

As detailed in the section before one, in addition to driving-licence categories there exist driving-licence codes.

These do not refer to vehicles, but rather certain conditions that can be placed on a person’s driving licence, for one or many of the class of vehicles they can drive. For example a code might indicate you have to wear corrective glasses or lenses to drive, or that you are an organ donor.

The licence codes are as follows (information taken from UK Gov website, multiple codes shown per line to reduce scrolling).

01 – eyesight correction, for example glasses or contact lenses 02 – hearing/communication aid 10 – modified transmission 15 – modified clutch 20 – modified braking systems 25 – modified accelerator systems 30 – combined braking and accelerator systems (for licences issued before 28 November 2016) 31 – pedal adaptations and pedal safeguards 32 – combined service brake and accelerator systems 33 – combined service brake, accelerator and steering systems 35 – modified control layouts 40 – modified steering 42 – modified rear-view mirror(s) 43 – modified driving seats 44 – modifications to motorbikes 44 (1) – single operated brake 44 (2) – adapted front wheel brake 44 (3) – adapted rear wheel brake 44 (4) – adapted accelerator 44 (5) – (adjusted) manual transmission and manual clutch 44 (6) – (adjusted) rear-view mirror(s) 44 (7) – (adjusted) commands (direction indicators, braking light, etc) 44 (8) – seat height allowing the driver, in sitting position, to have two feet on the surface at the same time and balance the motorcycle during stopping and standing 44 (11) – adapted foot rest 44 (12) – adapted hand grip 45 – motorbikes only with sidecar 46 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014) 70 – exchange of licence 71 – duplicate of licence 78 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmission 79 – restricted to vehicles in conformity with the specifications stated in brackets on your licence 79 (2) – restricted to category AM vehicles of the 3-wheel or light quadricycle type 79 (3) – restricted to tricycles 96 – allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer where the trailer weighs at least 750kg, and the combined weight of the vehicle and trailer is between 3,500kg and 4,250kg 97 – not allowed to drive category C1 vehicles which are required to have a tachograph fitted 101 – not for hire or reward (that is, not to make a profit) 102 – drawbar trailers only 103 – subject to certificate of competence 105 – vehicle not more than 5.5 metres long 106 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmissions 107 – not more than 8,250 kilograms 108 – subject to minimum age requirements 110 – limited to transporting persons with restricted mobility 111 – limited to 16 passenger seats 113 – limited to 16 passenger seats except for automatics 114 – with any special controls required for safe driving 115 – organ donor 118 – start date is for earliest entitlement 119 – weight limit for vehicle does not apply 121 – restricted to conditions specified in the Secretary of State’s notice 122 – valid on successful completion: Basic Moped Training Course. This does not apply to trial e-scooters 125 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014)

Driving licence FAQs

Where is the driving licence number?

Your driving licence number can be found on the front of your photocard licence, under section 5.

Where is the issue number of a driving licence?

Your driving-licence issue number is on the same line as your licence number, with a slight space between the two numbers.

What type of driving licence do I have?

There are two main types of driving licence in the UK, full and provisional. A full licence will be pink and a provisional licence will be green, and clearly marked.

Following on from that there are a number of different licence categories, which set out what type of vehicles you are allowed to drive. If you have passed your car driving test you will be allowed to drive cars, which are class B on your driving licence, defined as vehicles with no more than eight passenger seats, and weighing no more than 3,500kg, fully laden.

Are paper driving licences still valid?

If you have a paper driving licence that was issued before March 2000 and the information on it is still correct, it is still valid. If you need to change your name or address, a photocard licence will be issued to replace the paper one, though.

Driving in the UK

About Us

Driving in the UK

Anyone driving in the UK must:

  • Have a Valid current DRIVING LICENCE
  • Be covered by INSURANCE
  • Drive a vehicle REGISTERED in the owner’s name
  • Drive a vehicle with valid ROAD TAX (there are some exemptions)

The Immigration and International Student Advice team have produced a guidance sheet to help you plan to drive in the UK.  Additional information on driving in the UK is below. You can find further information on all topics, and additional areas such as riding Mopeds and Motorcycles on the UKCISA Website.

BUY UK DRIVING LICENCE

buy a driver’s licence Looking for a place to buy a driver’s licence? No exam, no driving license. Buy a driver’s licence online. Buying a driver’s license legally in Europe has become a very difficult task for many as how to get a driver’s license without passing an exam . We offer you the opportunity to buy a genuine registered UK driver’s licence worry-free. Buy a registered driver’s license online.

Today the procedures are so complicated that some citizens are forced to change countries to find rarely found solutions.

You can buy a driver’s license directly from a driving school without taking an exam. We are working behind the scenes to issue European driver’s licences.

Buy Driving Licence UK

How to buy drivers license from this site

We work with driving schools in the UK where hundreds of drivers pass every year. We understand, however, that you may be too far from us or not have much time and money at your disposal. Your file will be treated with the name of one of these automatic schools, with consistency and

professionalism so that there is no visible difference

between it and the others. Buy drivers licence. buy driving licence b online,

contact us

We register you for the theoretical and practical exam and you automatically pass the exams. The license is then delivered to one of these driving schools that they sent us on behalf of our partnership and after registering the license in the database via our contacts on the site. We send you back through a shipping agency. Buy Drivers licence online.

We provide absolutely all categories of driving licences in the Uk from the sub-categories of category A for two-wheeled vehicles to the sub-categories of category D for passengers, including the sub-categories of categories B and C for vehicles light trucks and trucks. Buy driving license online at an affordable price now.

We have designed a system that guarantees you complete anonymity, allowing you to be in good standing in the event of an inspection so you can drive peacefully and have nothing to fear. A driver’s license is an official document that confers the administrative right to drive a vehicle in a particular country. Gives the right to drive on a public road one or more vehicles which can be a car (category B for less than 3500 kilograms and C for over 3500 kilograms), a motorcycle (category A), a moped, a truck (category C ), a bus (category D) or for coupled vehicles (category E). buy genuine driving licence, buy real driving licence, buy authentic driving license in the UK

buy driving licence online

Want to know the ins and outs of the UK driving licence? You’ve come to the right place

As well as being a key form of identification, the UK driving licence gives you the right to drive a car, plus certain types of other vehicles. But as the licence is full of information, codes and categories, you might be after an explainer on both what the front of the driving licence shows, and what the details on the back of a driving licence mean. This guide will explain all this.

Front of the driving licence explained

The front of the driving licence displays a photograph of the licence holder with the licence expiry date printed on top, as well key information about them, and the types of vehicle their licence permits them to drive.

Each section on the front of a driving licence is numbered, with each number showing the following information:

1. Your surname
2. Your first name(s)
3. Your date and country of birth
4a. The date your licence was issued
4b. The date your licence expires
4c. What agency issued your licence (usually DVLA)
5. Your driving licence number*
6. Although not numbered on the licence, your photograph is 6
7. Your signature
8. Your address
9. The categories of vehicle you’re permitted to drive – see next section.

*This is made up of the first five letters of your surname, your birth year, month and day, plus the letters two of your middle names begin with, with the number ‘9’ standing in if you only have one middle name. Note the two numbers that make up your birth year are split in two and bookend the long number, rather than being displayed sequentially. There are also three computer-assigned digits at the end, plus a separate pair of numbers on the same line that represent your licence issue number.

Back of the driving licence explained

A number of categories are displayed on the back of your driving licence, displayed in a table with four columns, labelled 9-12.

Column 9 shows the code and an image representing classes of vehicle
Column 10 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle is valid
Column 11 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle expires
Column 12 shows driving licence codes – EG ‘115’ means organ donor (see section after next).

What are driving licence categories?

While the icons help you work out what vehicles you’re allowed to drive, they might not all be intuitively understandable.

Driving licence categories explained

AM (‘q’ proper to 2013): mopeds capable of at least 15mph and no more than 28mph, and light quadricycles with the same speed requirements, weighing no more than 350kg.
A1: motorcycles under 125cc capacity and 11kW (15hp) of power
A2: motorcycles with no more power than 35kW (47.6hp)
A: motorcycles with more than 35kW
B: cars**
B1: four-wheeled light vehicles (under 550kg)
BE: cars with trailers
C1: medium-sized vehicles weighing 3,500kg to 7,500kg carrying no more than eight passengers
C1E: medium-sized vehicles with trailers
C: large goods vehicles weighing over 3,500kg
CE: large goods vehicles with trailers
D1: minibuses no longer than 8 metres and with no more than 16 seats
D: buses with more than eight seats
D1E: minibuses with trailers over 750kg
DE: buses with trailers over 750kg
f: agricultural tractors
g: roadrollers
h: tracked vehicles
k: ride-on mowers and pedestrian-controlled vehicles

**Category B includes light vans (weighing under 3,500kg) and means different things with regard to towing depending on when you passed your test – see our guide to towing for more information.

What are driving licence codes?

As detailed in the section before one, in addition to driving-licence categories there exist driving-licence codes.

These do not refer to vehicles, but rather certain conditions that can be placed on a person’s driving licence, for one or many of the class of vehicles they can drive. For example a code might indicate you have to wear corrective glasses or lenses to drive, or that you are an organ donor.

The licence codes are as follows (information taken from UK Gov website, multiple codes shown per line to reduce scrolling).

01 – eyesight correction, for example glasses or contact lenses 02 – hearing/communication aid 10 – modified transmission 15 – modified clutch 20 – modified braking systems 25 – modified accelerator systems 30 – combined braking and accelerator systems (for licences issued before 28 November 2016) 31 – pedal adaptations and pedal safeguards 32 – combined service brake and accelerator systems 33 – combined service brake, accelerator and steering systems 35 – modified control layouts 40 – modified steering 42 – modified rear-view mirror(s) 43 – modified driving seats 44 – modifications to motorbikes 44 (1) – single operated brake 44 (2) – adapted front wheel brake 44 (3) – adapted rear wheel brake 44 (4) – adapted accelerator 44 (5) – (adjusted) manual transmission and manual clutch 44 (6) – (adjusted) rear-view mirror(s) 44 (7) – (adjusted) commands (direction indicators, braking light, etc) 44 (8) – seat height allowing the driver, in sitting position, to have two feet on the surface at the same time and balance the motorcycle during stopping and standing 44 (11) – adapted foot rest 44 (12) – adapted hand grip 45 – motorbikes only with sidecar 46 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014) 70 – exchange of licence 71 – duplicate of licence 78 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmission 79 – restricted to vehicles in conformity with the specifications stated in brackets on your licence 79 (2) – restricted to category AM vehicles of the 3-wheel or light quadricycle type 79 (3) – restricted to tricycles 96 – allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer where the trailer weighs at least 750kg, and the combined weight of the vehicle and trailer is between 3,500kg and 4,250kg 97 – not allowed to drive category C1 vehicles which are required to have a tachograph fitted 101 – not for hire or reward (that is, not to make a profit) 102 – drawbar trailers only 103 – subject to certificate of competence 105 – vehicle not more than 5.5 metres long 106 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmissions 107 – not more than 8,250 kilograms 108 – subject to minimum age requirements 110 – limited to transporting persons with restricted mobility 111 – limited to 16 passenger seats 113 – limited to 16 passenger seats except for automatics 114 – with any special controls required for safe driving 115 – organ donor 118 – start date is for earliest entitlement 119 – weight limit for vehicle does not apply 121 – restricted to conditions specified in the Secretary of State’s notice 122 – valid on successful completion: Basic Moped Training Course. This does not apply to trial e-scooters 125 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014)

Driving licence FAQs

Where is the driving licence number?

Your driving licence number can be found on the front of your photocard licence, under section 5.

Where is the issue number of a driving licence?

Your driving-licence issue number is on the same line as your licence number, with a slight space between the two numbers.

What type of driving licence do I have?

There are two main types of driving licence in the UK, full and provisional. A full licence will be pink and a provisional licence will be green, and clearly marked.

Following on from that there are a number of different licence categories, which set out what type of vehicles you are allowed to drive. If you have passed your car driving test you will be allowed to drive cars, which are class B on your driving licence, defined as vehicles with no more than eight passenger seats, and weighing no more than 3,500kg, fully laden.

Are paper driving licences still valid?

If you have a paper driving licence that was issued before March 2000 and the information on it is still correct, it is still valid. If you need to change your name or address, a photocard licence will be issued to replace the paper one, though.

UK driving licence Without a Test

Want to know the ins and outs of the UK driving licence? You’ve come to the right place

As well as being a key form of identification, the UK driving licence gives you the right to drive a car, plus certain types of other vehicles. But as the licence is full of information, codes and categories, you might be after an explainer on both what the front of the driving licence shows, and what the details on the back of a driving licence mean. This guide will explain all this.

Front of the driving licence explained

The front of the driving licence displays a photograph of the licence holder with the licence expiry date printed on top, as well key information about them, and the types of vehicle their licence permits them to drive.

Each section on the front of a driving licence is numbered, with each number showing the following information:

1. Your surname
2. Your first name(s)
3. Your date and country of birth
4a. The date your licence was issued
4b. The date your licence expires
4c. What agency issued your licence (usually DVLA)
5. Your driving licence number*
6. Although not numbered on the licence, your photograph is 6
7. Your signature
8. Your address
9. The categories of vehicle you’re permitted to drive – see next section.

*This is made up of the first five letters of your surname, your birth year, month and day, plus the letters two of your middle names begin with, with the number ‘9’ standing in if you only have one middle name. Note the two numbers that make up your birth year are split in two and bookend the long number, rather than being displayed sequentially. There are also three computer-assigned digits at the end, plus a separate pair of numbers on the same line that represent your licence issue number.

Back of the driving licence explained

A number of categories are displayed on the back of your driving licence, displayed in a table with four columns, labelled 9-12.

Column 9 shows the code and an image representing classes of vehicle
Column 10 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle is valid
Column 11 is date from which your licence for that class of vehicle expires
Column 12 shows driving licence codes – EG ‘115’ means organ donor (see section after next).

What are driving licence categories?

While the icons help you work out what vehicles you’re allowed to drive, they might not all be intuitively understandable.

Driving licence categories explained

AM (‘q’ proper to 2013): mopeds capable of at least 15mph and no more than 28mph, and light quadricycles with the same speed requirements, weighing no more than 350kg.
A1: motorcycles under 125cc capacity and 11kW (15hp) of power
A2: motorcycles with no more power than 35kW (47.6hp)
A: motorcycles with more than 35kW
B: cars**
B1: four-wheeled light vehicles (under 550kg)
BE: cars with trailers
C1: medium-sized vehicles weighing 3,500kg to 7,500kg carrying no more than eight passengers
C1E: medium-sized vehicles with trailers
C: large goods vehicles weighing over 3,500kg
CE: large goods vehicles with trailers
D1: minibuses no longer than 8 metres and with no more than 16 seats
D: buses with more than eight seats
D1E: minibuses with trailers over 750kg
DE: buses with trailers over 750kg
f: agricultural tractors
g: roadrollers
h: tracked vehicles
k: ride-on mowers and pedestrian-controlled vehicles

**Category B includes light vans (weighing under 3,500kg) and means different things with regard to towing depending on when you passed your test – see our guide to towing for more information.

What are driving licence codes?

As detailed in the section before one, in addition to driving-licence categories there exist driving-licence codes.

These do not refer to vehicles, but rather certain conditions that can be placed on a person’s driving licence, for one or many of the class of vehicles they can drive. For example a code might indicate you have to wear corrective glasses or lenses to drive, or that you are an organ donor.

The licence codes are as follows (information taken from UK Gov website, multiple codes shown per line to reduce scrolling).

01 – eyesight correction, for example glasses or contact lenses 02 – hearing/communication aid 10 – modified transmission 15 – modified clutch 20 – modified braking systems 25 – modified accelerator systems 30 – combined braking and accelerator systems (for licences issued before 28 November 2016) 31 – pedal adaptations and pedal safeguards 32 – combined service brake and accelerator systems 33 – combined service brake, accelerator and steering systems 35 – modified control layouts 40 – modified steering 42 – modified rear-view mirror(s) 43 – modified driving seats 44 – modifications to motorbikes 44 (1) – single operated brake 44 (2) – adapted front wheel brake 44 (3) – adapted rear wheel brake 44 (4) – adapted accelerator 44 (5) – (adjusted) manual transmission and manual clutch 44 (6) – (adjusted) rear-view mirror(s) 44 (7) – (adjusted) commands (direction indicators, braking light, etc) 44 (8) – seat height allowing the driver, in sitting position, to have two feet on the surface at the same time and balance the motorcycle during stopping and standing 44 (11) – adapted foot rest 44 (12) – adapted hand grip 45 – motorbikes only with sidecar 46 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014) 70 – exchange of licence 71 – duplicate of licence 78 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmission 79 – restricted to vehicles in conformity with the specifications stated in brackets on your licence 79 (2) – restricted to category AM vehicles of the 3-wheel or light quadricycle type 79 (3) – restricted to tricycles 96 – allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer where the trailer weighs at least 750kg, and the combined weight of the vehicle and trailer is between 3,500kg and 4,250kg 97 – not allowed to drive category C1 vehicles which are required to have a tachograph fitted 101 – not for hire or reward (that is, not to make a profit) 102 – drawbar trailers only 103 – subject to certificate of competence 105 – vehicle not more than 5.5 metres long 106 – restricted to vehicles with automatic transmissions 107 – not more than 8,250 kilograms 108 – subject to minimum age requirements 110 – limited to transporting persons with restricted mobility 111 – limited to 16 passenger seats 113 – limited to 16 passenger seats except for automatics 114 – with any special controls required for safe driving 115 – organ donor 118 – start date is for earliest entitlement 119 – weight limit for vehicle does not apply 121 – restricted to conditions specified in the Secretary of State’s notice 122 – valid on successful completion: Basic Moped Training Course. This does not apply to trial e-scooters 125 – tricycles only (for licences issued before 29 June 2014)

Driving licence FAQs

Where is the driving licence number?

Your driving licence number can be found on the front of your photocard licence, under section 5.

Where is the issue number of a driving licence?

Your driving-licence issue number is on the same line as your licence number, with a slight space between the two numbers.

What type of driving licence do I have?

There are two main types of driving licence in the UK, full and provisional. A full licence will be pink and a provisional licence will be green, and clearly marked.

Following on from that there are a number of different licence categories, which set out what type of vehicles you are allowed to drive. If you have passed your car driving test you will be allowed to drive cars, which are class B on your driving licence, defined as vehicles with no more than eight passenger seats, and weighing no more than 3,500kg, fully laden.

Are paper driving licences still valid?

If you have a paper driving licence that was issued before March 2000 and the information on it is still correct, it is still valid. If you need to change your name or address, a photocard licence will be issued to replace the paper one, though.

UK Driving Licence And categories

Driving licence codes and categories explained

Driving licence codes and categories explained  17th Dec 2021

 It’s easy to overlook the small print on our driving licences, not to mention the letters and numbers that fill the table at the back of our photocards.However random they might seem, these characters tell us a lot about the types of vehicles we can drive and much more. That’s why we’ve decided to break it all down to help you better understand driving licence codes and driving licence categories. Read on to help make sense of them all.

What are driving licence codes and categories?

The seemingly random letters and numbers on driving licences can be split into two groups:

  • Driving licence categories given in letters or a combination of letters and numbers e.g. ‘C’ and ‘C1’. These tell us which vehicles we’re allowed to drive.
  • Driving licence codes given in numbers only e.g. ‘01’ and ‘79(2)’. These tell us the conditions a driver should meet to drive. For example, ‘01’ is a common code indicating someone needs glasses or contact lenses to drive.

Find the full list of driving licence codes on the gov.uk website.

Driving licences explained

driving-licence-codes-photocard The easiest way to see which categories your licence covers is to look at section nine of your photocard. Found on the front of the card, this section shows driving licence categories represented by letters separated by commas or slashes. Capital letters refer to categories recognised across Europe, while lower case letters refer to national categories. On the back of your driving licence, you’ll notice a table with three columns:

  • Column 9 shows types of vehicles you can drive
  • Column 10 shows the licence start date
  • Column 11 shows the licence end date
  • Column 12 shows driving licence codes

What driving licence categories apply to cars?

B

Category B can mean one of two things depending on when you passed your test. If you passed before 1 January 1997, you’re allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer combination with a maximum authorised mass (MAM) of 8,250kg. You can also drive a minibus with a trailer over 750kg MAM. See categories D1 and D1E for more on minibus categories. If you passed your test on or after 1 January 1997, you can drive vehicles up to 3,500kg MAM with up to 8 passenger seats and with a trailer up to 750kg. You can also tow heavier trailers if the total MAM of the vehicle and trailer is no more than 3,500kg. Category B licences also allow you to drive motor tricycles with a power output higher than 15kW if you are over 21 years old.

B auto

This one’s simple, you can drive any of the vehicles included in Category B but only with an automatic transmission.

BE

The BE category currently appears on drivers’ licences if the holder has passed a car and trailer driving test. However, the DVLA hopes to change the law so this test isn’t needed and all new photocard licences will include the category. Drivers who passed their test from 1 January 1997 face tighter towing restrictions until these rules change. New rules were originally scheduled for 15 November 2021 and are likely to come into force in the near future. Keep an eye on the gov.uk website for more details.

B1

This category appears next to the image of a small van on the back of your licence. It means that you can drive a vehicle with ‘4 wheels up to 400kg unladen or 550kg if they’re designed for carrying goods.’ We’ve included it here as the code features on all licences when drivers have passed a standard test.

FREE Battery Replace

For a limited time, get FREE Battery Replace worth £42 with your RAC Breakdown Cover^.Buy nowFREE Battery Replace

What driving licence categories apply to vans and lorries?

driving-licence-codes-vans

C

Category C refers to large goods vehicles, meaning you can drive anything over 3,500 kg (with a trailer up to 750kg MAM). To get a Category C licence you’ll need a full car driving licence and to apply for a provisional lorry licence. If your doctor decides you’re healthy enough to drive a larger vehicle, you can then take the four-part CPC (Driver Certificate of Professional Competence) test.

CE

Almost identical to Category C but you can also tow a trailer over 750kg.

C1

C1 is a little more restrictive than a Category C, as it only lets you drive vehicles between 3,500 and 7,500kg MAM (with a trailer up to 750kg).

C1E

Category C1E drivers can drive C1 vehicles with a trailer over 750kg. The combined weight of both cannot exceed 12,000kg.

What driving licence categories apply to motorbikes?

A

Holders of a Category A licence are allowed to drive any bike of any sized engine. The licence is only available to riders aged 24 and over, or 21 and over if you’ve held an A2 licence for two years. You need to have completed your compulsory basic training (CBT) and passed a theory and practical test.

A1

Category A1 riders can drive light motorbikes with an engine up to 125cc and a power output up to 11kW. The category also allows riders to use motor tricycles with a power output up to 15kW. Riders need to be 17 or over to take a test and must complete their compulsory basic training (CBT) and have passed a theory test and practical test.

A2

Category A2 is a step up from A1 and lets licence holders ride bikes up to 35kW. Bikes can’t be derived from a vehicle more than double its power and you need to be 19 years old to apply for a test.

AM

The AM category applies to mopeds rather than motorbikes. It allows a licence holder to drive two-wheeled or three-wheeled vehicles with a maximum speed of 28mph. It also allows riders to use light quad bikes with the same max speed and unladen mass of 350kg (not including batteries if it’s an electric vehicle). To get an AM licence you’ll need to be at least 16 years old, to have a valid CBT certificate and to pass the motorbike theory test and two-module practical test.

p

Another moped category, the letter p appears in italics and lower case on photocard licences to show that the holder can drive two-wheeled vehicles with a maximum design speed of over 28mph but no more than 31 mph. Engines must be no more powerful than 50cc and the category appears on all standard full driving licences.

q

Category q lets licence holders drive two and three-wheeled vehicles without pedals if the engine size is no more than 50cc and the maximum design speed doesn’t exceed 15.5mph. The category also includes e-scooters.

What other driving licence categories are there?

Other categories include:

  • D – You can drive any bus with 8 passenger seats and a trailer up to 750kg.
  • D1 – You can drive minibuses with no more than 16 passenger seats, a maximum length of 8 metres and a trailer up to 750kg.
  • D1E – You can drive D1 minibuses with the option to tow a trailer over 750kg. The combined weight cannot exceed 12,000kg.
  • f – agricultural tractors
  • G – Road roller
  • H – Tracked vehicles
  • k – Mowing machine or pedestrian-controlled vehicles
  • l – Electrically-propelled vehicles
  • M – Trolley vehicles
  • n – Exempt from duty